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Why Does My Dog Lick Other Dogs’ Pee? – is It Harmful? (2022)

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Why Does My Dog Lick Other Dogs' PeeHave you ever wondered “why does your dog lick other dogs’ pee?” If so, you’re not alone. Many dog owners have questions about why their dog licks other dogs’ urine.

It turns out that there are a few reasons why your dog might lick other dogs’ pee.

Read on to learn more about why your dog licks other dogs’ urine and what you can do about it.

Why Does My Dog Lick Other Dogs’ Pee?

One possible explanation is that your dog is trying to gain information about the other dog. Dogs can learn a lot from urine, including age, health, diet, and social status. By licking another dog’s urine, your dog may be trying to figure out where that other dog fits in the pack hierarchy.

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Another possibility is that your dog simply enjoys the taste of urine. Dogs have been known to lick all sorts of things that we humans find gross, including garbage, feces, and even their own vomit. So if your dog enjoys the taste of pee, there’s no need to worry.

Of course, there could be other reasons why your dog is licking urine. If your dog is fixated on licking urine, it’s best to consult with a veterinarian to rule out any possible medical causes.

The Risks of Dogs Licking Other Dogs’ Pee

The Risks of Dogs Licking Other Dogs' PeeWhen your dog greets another dog by licking their pee, they are exposing themselves to a number of potential health risks. While it may seem like harmless behavior, there are a number of bacteria and viruses that can be transmitted through urine, including:

  • Leptospirosis: This bacteria is found in water and soil that has been contaminated by the urine of infected animals, and can cause kidney damage, liver failure, and even death in dogs.
  • Parvovirus: This virus is highly contagious and can cause severe diarrhea, vomiting, and dehydration in dogs. It is often fatal, especially in young puppies.
  • Rabies: This virus is transmitted through the saliva of infected animals, and can cause severe neurological damage and death in dogs.

While these are the most serious health risks associated with dogs licking other dogs’ pee, there are also a number of other potential problems that can occur. For example, dogs can pick up other dogs’ smells on their fur, which can lead to problems with house training.

In addition, dogs may consume large amounts of salt and other minerals when licking urine, which can lead to electrolyte imbalances.

So, while it may seem like harmless behavior, there are a number of potential risks associated with dogs licking other dogs’ pee. If you are concerned about your dog’s safety, it is best to avoid letting them engage in this behavior.

How to Stop Your Dog From Licking Other Dogs’ Pee

We’ve all been there-you’re out on a walk with your dog and they just can’t help themselves. They’ve got to stop and smell (and sometimes taste) every single dog’s pee they come across. While it may not bother you, it can definitely be a nuisance – not to mention, it’s not the most hygienic habit. So, how can you stop your dog from licking other dogs’ pee?

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Here are a few tips:

  • Keep them on a leash: This may seem obvious, but it’s the best way to control your dog and prevent them from getting too close to other dogs’ urine.
  • Distract them: If you see your dog starting to lower their head to sniff or lick another dog’s pee, give them a little tug on the leash and get their attention with a treat or toy.
  • Reward good behavior: Whenever your dog walks past a spot where another dog has peed without stopping to sniff or lick, give them a treat. This will reinforce the behavior you want to see.
  • Clean up accidents quickly: If your dog does happen to lick another dog’s pee, clean their mouth and paws off with a wet cloth as soon as possible. You may also want to give them a little drink of water to help rinse out their mouth.

With a little patience and consistency, you can train your dog to stop licking other dogs’ pee. Just remember to be vigilant and take action as soon as you see them starting to do it.

FAQs

Is it normal for my dog to lick other dogs’ pee?

Yes, it’s perfectly normal. Dogs have a keen sense of smell and often use licking as a way to investigate their surroundings.

What does it mean when my dog licks other dogs’ pee?

Most likely, it simply means that your dog is curious about the other dog. Licking urine is often a way for dogs to gather information about the other dog’s health, diet, and social status.

Is it harmful to my dog to lick other dogs’ pee?

No, it is not harmful to your dog to lick other dogs’ pee. However, if your dog is licking other dogs’ pee excessively, it could be a sign of an underlying health issue.

Should I be worried if my dog licks other dogs’ pee?

If your dog is licking other dogs’ pee excessively, it could be a sign of an underlying health issue. Otherwise, there is no need to worry.

What should I do if my dog licks other dogs’ pee?

If your dog is licking other dogs’ pee excessively, you should take them to the vet to rule out any underlying health issues. Otherwise, there is no need to take any action.

Why is my dog licking herself so much?

There could be a few reasons why your dog is licking herself so much. It could be that she is trying to clean herself or remove a foreign object from her fur. It could also be a sign of anxiety or stress. If your dog is licking herself excessively, it could be a sign of an underlying health issue such as an infection.

Conclusion

It’s still unclear why dogs lick other dogs’ pee, but it’s likely that they’re either trying to gather information about the other dog or that they simply enjoy the taste. Whatever the reason, it’s important to make sure that your dog is well-trained so that they don’t start licking random dogs’ pee without your permission.

Avatar for Mutasim Sweileh
Mutasim Sweileh

Mutasim is the founder and editor-in-chief with a team of qualified veterinarians, their goal? Simple. Break the jargon and help you make the right decisions for your furry four-legged friends.